Medical & Clinical Psychology

Natasha Schvey, Ph.D.

Natasha Schvey

Name: Natasha Schvey, Ph.D.

Department of Primary Appointment: Medical & Clinical Psychology
Position: USU Faculty
Title: Assistant Professor

Research Interests:
Stigmatization; Vulnerable Populations; Obesity; Transgender Health; Barriers to Mental Health Care

Email: natasha.schvey@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)
Office Phone: (301) 451-3782
Room: B3039A

Links
PubMed Listing

Education

University
Yale University

Profile

Dr. Schvey is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Medical and Clinical Psychology at the Uniformed Services University. She earned her PhD in Clinical Psychology in 2014 from Yale University and completed her clinical internship in Behavioral Medicine at the Yale School of Medicine. Dr. Schvey’s research focuses broadly on discrimination and bias among vulnerable populations. More specifically, she is interested in bias as it pertains to weight status, mental health, and gender dysphoria among service members and dependents. Dr. Schvey has conducted a programmatic line of research investigating the behavioral, clinical, physiological, and legal consequences of weight stigmatization. She has published a range of experimental studies, reviews, and chapters, and has presented to academic, professional, and community organizations throughout the country. 

Kathryn Eklund, 1LT

Name: Kathryn Eklund, 1LT

Department of Primary Appointment: Medical & Clinical Psychology
Position: Lab Member - Graduate Student
Title: Third Year Graduate Student

Email: kathryn.eklund@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)

Links
Lab Website

Profile

1LT Kathryn Eklund is a third year graduate student (U.S. Army) working towards a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Kathryn attended Southern Utah University in Cedar City, UT, where she earned a B.S. in Psychology (2012). Under the supervision of Dr. Grant Corser and Dr. Britton Mace, she conducted research on psychological control, aggression and impulsivity. Throughout college she worked at inpatient residential treatment centers for adolescent males and females as well as community centers for developmentally disabled adults. While in Utah, she enlisted in the U.S. Army Reserves and served three years in the 308th Multifunctional Medical Battalion as a radio operator-maintainer. Her Master’s thesis entitled, “Examination of the Gateway Hypothesis in a Rat Model” focused on the effects of nicotine use on subsequent morphine self-administration in rats. Kathryn’s research interests include women in leadership, the 172nd studying pharmacotherapies, such as ketamine, for PTSD and TBI, as well as the neurobiological factors underlying nicotine use and subsequent morphine self-administration in adolescents. Kathryn’s doctoral research will address gender and leadership. Kathryn has completed a clinical externship at Mt. Washington Pediatric Hospital and is currently working at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. 

Amanda Webb, M.A., MAJ

Name: Amanda Webb, M.A., MAJ

Department of Primary Appointment: Medical & Clinical Psychology
Position: Lab Member - Graduate Student
Title: Fourth Year Graduate Student

Email: amanda.webb@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)

Links
Lab Website

Profile

MAJ Amanda Webb, M.A. is a fourth year graduate student (U.S. Army) working towards a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Amanda attended North Georgia College and State University on a four-year Army ROTC Scholarship, where she earned a bachelor's degree in Psychology. After college, she commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army's Military Intelligence Corps and served as a Battalion Intelligence Officer, Platoon Leader, Company Commander, and Division Intelligence Officer Observer/Controller/Trainer. She was assigned to 7-101 AVN, 311th MI BN, 3rd Brigade, 101st ABN DIV (AASLT), and Operations Group Joint Readiness Training Center and completed three combat deployments (Afghanistan, OEF X and Iraq, OIF I & IV). Amanda earned an M.A. degree in Clinical and Community Psychology (2007) from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. While at UNCC, she served as a psychological intern at Piedmont Correctional Institution in Salisbury, NC. Her Master’s thesis entitled, “Effects of caffeine and stress on mental health: An animal model” focused on the effects of caffeine and stress on behavioral indices of anxiety and depression in rats. Amanda also is working with the Consortium of Health and Military Performance (CHAMP) on projects related to health and well-being of Special Operators. Amanda has completed clinical externships at Fort Belvoir TBI/NICoE, 1st Special Warfare Training Group, and DCVA Substance Abuse clinic. Amanda’s doctoral dissertation is entitled, “Predicting attrition in the MOS phase of an army specialty training program.” She is currently developing her clinical skills at Fort Belvoir Adult Behavioral Health clinic.

Maggie Baisley, 1LT

Maggie Baisley

Name: Maggie Baisley, 1LT

Department of Primary Appointment: Medical & Clinical Psychology
Position: Lab Member - Graduate Student
Title: Fifth Year Graduate Student

Email: margaret.baisley@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)

Links
Lab Website

Profile

1LT Maggie Baisley is a fifth year graduate student (U.S. Army) working towards a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. She earned a B.S. in Psychology with a minor in Business Administration from Fordham University in 2012, where she was also a member of NYC Army ROTC. At Fordham, she worked under the supervision of Dr. Rachel Annunziato and studied interventions to help adolescent pediatric patients transition to adult-oriented care. Her honors thesis investigated peer feedback as a tool to develop professional behavior in undergraduates. Her Master’s thesis entitled, “A model of military deployment: Effects of psychological stress and caffeine use on information processing in male rats” focused on how caffeine affects behavior under stress and sleep disruption conditions in male rats to model the deployed experience of our service members and possibly inform military policy on caffeine use. For her doctoral research, entitled “The electronic Humor to Cope and Connect (e-H2C) workshop: Feasibility of internet-based humor skills training,” she is developing and piloting an Internet-based humor skills workshop intended to teach and motivate participants to use empirically based humor strategies more effectively in their lives. Maggie has received clinical training across military and civilian outpatient settings. She has developed particular interests in existentially-based integrative approaches to processing trauma, stressful life experiences, and associated identity concerns. She is currently on internship at Madigan Army Medical Center.

Maj (S) Katrina D. Powell, USAF

Name: Maj (S) Katrina D. Powell, USAF

Department of Primary Appointment: Medical & Clinical Psychology
Position: Volunteer
Title:

Email: katrina.powell@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)
Room: B1022

Profile

Major (S) Katrina D. Powell, USAF is a 2015 Cohort year student working towards a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. Katrina earned her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology and English from the Virginia Military Institute in 2006. After graduating, Katrina commissioned into the United States Air Force as a Behavioral Scientist (61B). She began her Air Force career at Edwards AFB, CA at the 773rd Flight Test squadron as a CV-22, F-16, and B-1 Human Factors Engineer and later as the Lead Research engineer in Curriculum Standards Division at the USAF Test Pilot School.  In 2010, Katrina became a Military Information Support Operations (MISO) officer (formerly Psychological Operations).  Immediately after completing MISO training, Katrina was selected for an AF sponsored Master’s degree.  She attended Arizona State University where she earned her Master’s degree in Psychology in 2011. During her time at ASU, Katrina also earned her Master’s in English from California State University in Bakersfield in 2010.  Upon graduation from ASU, she deployed to an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia for six months. Katrina returned to the states and began working as an Instructor in the Behavioral Sciences and Leadership department at the USAF Academy in Colorado Springs (2012-2015) and Division Executive officer (2014-2015).  Katrina’s primary research interests include examining environmental effects on perception of body shape, racial identity, sense of belonging, and self-esteem in minority populations.  She is also interested in the effects of deployment on military families (ASU thesis).

Jennifer Bakalar, M.S.

Name: Jennifer Bakalar, M.S., Ph.D. Candidate

Department of Primary Appointment: Medical & Clinical Psychology
Position: USU Staff
Title:

Email: jennifer.bakalar@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)
Room: B1022

Profile

Jennifer Bakalar, M.S. is a doctoral candidate in the Medical and Clinical dual-track Ph.D. program (2010 Cohort). Jen graduated from Cornell University in 2008 with a B.A. in Psychology and a minor in French. From 2008-2010, she completed a post-baccalaureate Intramural Research Training Award fellowship in Child Psychiatry at the National Institute of Mental Health in Bethesda, MD. At USUHS, Jen’s research interests center on the impact of early adversity on the psychological and physical health of U.S. Military personnel. In 2011, she was awarded the American Psychological Association, Society for Military Psychology (Division 19) graduate student fellowship for her Masters research. In 2015, she was awarded a Henry Jackson Foundation Fellowship in the Medical Sciences. For her dissertation, she is investigating the association between pre-service adverse life events, eating disturbance, and body mass index in U.S. service members. 

CPT Sadé Soares, USA

Name: CPT Sadé Soares, USA

Department of Primary Appointment: Medical & Clinical Psychology
Position: Volunteer
Title: Graduate Research Assistant

Affiliated Center: USUCHD

Email: sade.soares@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)
Room: B1022

Profile

Captain Sadé Soares, USA is a 2014 Cohort student and Army officer of eight years working towards a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology. She earned her Bachelor's degree in Psychology from the US Military Academy at West Point in 2010. She served as an aide-de-camp to the division commander, while deployed to Kuwait, and assistant operations officer of a Military Entrance Processing Station before enrolling at USUHS. Sadé's primary research interests include the role of historical trauma as well as social and health disparities on ethnic minorities' well-being, primarily Native Hawaiians. She is also interested in the role of policy in addressing the condition of ethnic minorities and decreasing mental health stigma. Clinically, Sadé is mainly interested in military family resilience. She has worked as an interventionist in the Fitness and Lifestyle Improvement through Information Technology study and continues to be involved with the Preventing Obesity in Military Communities-Adolescents study.

Capt Kendra Oldham, USAF

Name: Capt Kendra Oldham, USAF

Department of Primary Appointment: Medical & Clinical Psychology
Position: Volunteer
Title: Graduate Student

Affiliated Center: USUCHD

Email: kendra.oldham@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)
Room: B1022

Profile

Captain Kendra L. Oldham, USAF is a 2013 Cohort year graduate student working towards a Ph.D.  in Clinical Psychology. Kendra attended Central Washington University on a three year Air Force ROTC Scholarship, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in Psychology. After commissioning, Kendra worked as a Special Agent for the Air Force Office of Special Investigations. During her time with OSI, Kendra conducted investigations of economic crimes, sexual assault, and other felony criminal offenses. Capt Oldham completed one combat deployment to Iraq (OEF) where she conducted missions in support of force protection. In 2012, she completed her M.S. in Criminal Justice from the University of Central Missouri and ended her career with OSI working for the AFOSI ICON, Quantico, VA. During her assignment with the ICON, Capt Oldham collaborated with numerous federal agencies, monitored current events worldwide to identify concerns to AFOSI and Air Force leadership, and provided guidance to OSI field units on investigations. Her primary research interests include obesity and weight stigma and how they affect emotional well-being of military members. Additionally, she is interested in exploring how anti-fat bias may erode unit cohesion and military readiness. She is currently working on the Preventing Obesity in Military Communities – Fit4Duty study, which seeks to reduce excess weight gain in U.S. Military service members.

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