Gabriela S. Dveksler, Ph.D.

Gabriela S. Dveksler, Ph.D.

gabriela dveksler

Name: Gabriela S. Dveksler, Ph.D.

Department of Primary Appointment: Pathology
Position: USU Faculty
Title: Professor

Affiliated Departments: Molecular & Cell Biology,

Email: gabriala.dveksler@usuhs.edu (link sends e-mail)
Office Phone: (301) 295-3450
Room: B3154

Links
Department Website

Profile

Profile

 

Current Research Interests:

Our laboratory studies the functions of members of the carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) gene family, known as pregnancy specific glycoproteins (PSGs). PSGs are expressed by the placenta of rodents, and primates including humans, which share the type of placentation in which maternal blood is in direct contact with the embryo. PSGs are secreted into the maternal circulation in increasing amounts until term and are the mostabundanttrophoblastic proteins in maternal blood during human pregnancy. Low PSG concentrations in serum correlate with several pregnancy pathologies suggesting that they are important for successful pregnancy. We are using molecular, cell biology and immunology techniques to understand the function of the 17 murine and of the 10 human pregnancy specific glycoprotein family members. We have generated several human and murine recombinant PSGs for our studies. We found that PSGs regulate the secretion of cytokines in vivo. Most importantly, we have shown that members of the human PSG family activate the anti-inflammatory cytokine transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-b1) resulting in an increase in the number of T-cells with regulatory function. TheassociationbetweenPSG1andTGF-bsuggeststhatPSGsplayaroleinthewell-established beneficial effects ofpregnancy in patientssuffering fromautoimmunediseases such asmultiplesclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, uveitis and psoriasis. Therefore we are exploring whether administrationofPSG1could be used as anoveltherapeutic agentin diseases related toundesiredimmuneactivation using animal models. In addition, we have characterized the receptor for several PSGs and found that they induce endothelial tube formation and the secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor, an important modulator of angiogenesis. Therefore, our studies indicate that PSGs are involved in two processes that are essential for pregnancy success: the establishment of the fetal-maternal blood supply and the regulation of the immune responses to the semi-allogeneic fetus.

Complete List of Published Work in MyBibliography:   http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/myncbi/gabriela.dveksler.1/bibliography/41145838/public/?sort=date&direction=ascending