SC2I Reports

sc2i Reports

SC2i believes in the value of measurement and metrics. These reports summarize the cost and operational savings provided by tools that SC2i has developed.


National Cost Savings from WounDx

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The WounDx project uses predictive analytics to improve the medical treatment of open wounds associated with trauma. It does so by maximizing the likelihood that a wound will properly heal, thereby speeding patient recovery. That faster recovery not only improves healthcare outcomes, but also reduces medical charges related to healthcare delivery. Those lower medical charges or cost savings arise from:

Reduced need for surgical debridement Reduced need for secondary wound closure Reduced need for inpatient ICU care Reduced need for inpatient general ward care Reduced need for outpatient rehabilitation Reduced exposure to hospital-acquired infections during inpatient care

Based on research from a thorough medical and public policy literature review as well as a survey of 24 U.S. hospitals, we estimate that the full deployment of WounDx could reduce annual medical charges in the U.S. healthcare system by $3.4 billion. Applying the same methodology to the U.S. Military Health System over the period from 2001 to 2014, we estimate that it could have reduced medical charges by $873 million.

The WounDx project uses predictive analytics to improve the medical treatment of open wounds associated with trauma. It does so by maximizing the likelihood that a wound will properly heal, thereby speeding patient recovery. That faster recovery not only improves healthcare outcomes, but also reduces medical charges related to healthcare delivery. Those lower medical charges or cost savings arise from:

  1. Reduced need for surgical debridement
  2. Reduced need for secondary wound closure
  3. Reduced need for inpatient ICU care
  4. Reduced need for inpatient general ward care
  5. Reduced need for outpatient rehabilitation
  6. Reduced exposure to hospital-acquired infections during inpatient care

Based on research from a thorough medical and public policy literature review as well as a survey of 24 U.S. hospitals, we estimate that the full deployment of WounDx could reduce annual medical charges in the U.S. healthcare system by $3.4 billion. Applying the same methodology to the U.S. Military Health System over the period from 2001 to 2014, we estimate that it could have reduced medical charges by $873 million.


Operational Savings from MTP Project

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"SC2i's MTP not only treats the warfighter on the battlefield, but helps him prosecute the war on it.” - Dr. Arthur Kellerman MD MPH, Dean of the F. Edward Hébert School of Medicine, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences.

The Surgical Critical Care Initiative’s (SC2i) Massive Transfusion Protocol (MTP) project uses predictive analytics to create a tool that not only produces successful outcomes for patients with wounds associated with trauma, but also more efficiently uses the blood products needed to treat them. It does so by better determining which patients would benefit from a massive transfusion of blood products. The project is expected to yield meaningful operational benefits for U.S. military forces in the field. Those benefits would be particularly pronounced in high-intensity warfare environments, where the rate and volume of trauma casualties may be high and the resources needed to treat them are likely to be constrained. To quantify these benefits, we used a scenario that simulates a NATO ground campaign to eject Russian and Belarus forces from an Eastern European country. Applying a series of combat and casualty models, we calculate that NATO would require 24 days to achieve battlefield victory and suffer 9,206 killed and 36,255 wounded in action in the process of doing so.

Our study uses these casualty projections to determine the benefits that SC2i’s MTP tool could provide to not only Level III military hospitals and the Armed Services Blood Program, but also military logistics and combat forces. Using SC2i’s MTP tool, we assess that NATO forces would consume 33,294 fewer units of red blood cells, 19,891 fewer units of fresh-frozen plasma, 1,860 fewer units of apheresis platelets, and 14,635 fewer units of cryoprecipitate than they otherwise would have in our envisioned scenario.

Operationally, that eliminates the need for 88 UH-60 blood product resupply missions. That, in turn, represents a savings of 20,592 gallons of aviation fuel. The saved aviation fuel would enable Allied forces to conduct 88 additional MEDEVAC missions—flying 616 more wounded soldiers off the battlefield, without expanding the existing air ambulance resources assigned to each corps. It would also enable Allied forces to carry out 88 additional AH-64 attack helicopter missions. The reduction in the needed blood products from the use of SC2i’s MTP tool would also free up capacity aboard Air Mobility Command fixed wing transports that would have airlifted those blood products into the theater. We estimate that the weight savings would be sufficient to ferry enough ordinance for 79 AH-64 attack helicopter missions. In essence, operational savings from SC2i’s MTP tool could provide not only the fuel needed for close air support missions, but also much of the ordinance with which to conduct those missions.