Describing Patient Engagement and Readmission Rates at a Large Navy Medical Center

Describing Patient Engagement and Readmission Rates at a Large Navy Medical Center

Bibliography

Name: Carlin & Vorachai Callaway & Sribanditmongkol

Rank: CDR; CDR

Presenter/Poster:

Year: 2016

Abstract

Describing Patient Engagement and Readmission Rates at a Large Navy Medical Center

CDR Carlin Callaway, NC, USN; MSN, MS, RN, ACNP-BC, ACNS-BC, AOCNP1
LCDR Shawna Grover, NC, USN; MSN, RN, ANP-BC, ACNS-BC, AOCNS2
LTJG Kenneth Steele, NC, USN; BSN, RN, OCN2
CDR Craig Cunningham, NC, USN; Ph.D., RN, CNOR3
CDR Vorachai Sribanditmongkol, NC, USN; Ph.D., RN, RNC-MNN, IBCLC, CNS3

1 Ambulatory Infusion Center, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, VA
2 Hematology Oncology Inpatient Unit, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, VA
3 Nursing Research & Department, Naval Medical Center Portsmouth, VA

Disclaimer
The views expressed in this article are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the Navy, Department of Defense, or the United States Government.
I am (a military service member) (an employee of the U.S. Government). This work was prepared as part of my official duties. Title 17 U.S.C. 105 provides that “Copyright protection under this title is not available for any work of the United States Government.” Title 17 U.S.C. 101 defines a United States Government work as a work prepared by a military service member or employee of the United States Government as part of that person’s official duties.
Research data derived from an approved Naval Medical Center, Portsmouth, VA IRB protocol.

Abstract
Oncology patients have been shown to have higher rates of hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge that are associated with a $17.4 billion cost burden. Evidence suggests one way to help patients take control of their health and avoid readmission is by bolstering behaviors that foster self-efficacy and sustain a patient’s ability to manage his/her health, also known as patient engagement. Patient activation is a reliable precursor to patient engagement and improvements in patient activation have been associated with improved self-care management, better health outcomes, and decreased readmissions. In addition, nurse-driven strategies (e.g., bedside handoffs, teach-backs, and discharge bundles) that provide education, resources, and knowledge assessments related to patient health conditions and treatments have been associated with improved patient activation. The purpose of this project was to describe the patient activation scores and readmission rates before and after implementing nurse-driven strategies - bedside handoffs, teach-backs, and discharge bundles - designed to bolster the provision of patient education, resources, and assessment of knowledge on an inpatient oncology unit at a large military medical center. A secondary objective was to compile observations and staff feedback into lessons-learned to be shared as a subsequent presentation.
This project was guided by the Plan-Do-Study-Act process improvement framework and utilized a pre-post design. Benchmark Patient Activation Measure (PAM) scores and readmission rates were obtained prior to project implementation. PAM scores and readmission rates were obtained during and following implementation of bedside handoffs, teach-backs, and discharge bundles. Data is currently being analyzed and will include descriptive and inferential statistics. The findings from this project will provide additional evidence regarding nurse-driven strategies seeking to impact quality care through patient engagement.